Antique 9ct Rose Gold Albert Watch Chain

Antique 9ct Rose Gold Albert Watch Chain / Choker Necklace

£1,425.00
SKU: SH5897

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A fantastic antique 9ct rose gold Albert watch chain which can also be worn as a choker necklace. The chain has been constructed using trombone long and short design links and made by Brtton and Sons, renowned makers of gold chains from 1855 to 1929. Each link is stamped 9 375 and dog clips have been fitted. A superb example of a traditional piece of jewellery popular in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. A part of our antique gold Albert chain collection.

SPECIFICATIONS
Length. 15” (38cm)
Width. 6mm
Weight. 28.4 grams
9k gold

ERA
Late Victorian – Edwardian (1880 – 1910)

Hallmark
Each link stamped 9 375

CONDITION
Excellent – This antique 9ct rose gold Albert watch chain / choker necklace is in superb condition with just very minimal wear. The 9 375 stamps to each link are nice and clear with only just a few showing signs of wear. This is a great example of a piece of jewellery popular in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Description

A fantastic antique 9ct rose gold Albert watch chain which can also be worn as a choker necklace. The chain has been constructed using trombone long and short design links and made by Brtton and Sons, renowned makers of gold chains from 1855 to 1929. Each link is stamped 9 375 and dog clips have been fitted. A superb example of a traditional piece of jewellery popular in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. A part of our antique gold Albert chain collection.

SPECIFICATIONS
Length. 15” (38cm)
Width. 6mm
Weight. 28.4 grams
9k gold

ERA
Late Victorian – Edwardian (1880 – 1910)

Hallmark
Each link stamped 9 375

CONDITION
Excellent – This antique 9ct rose gold Albert watch chain / choker necklace is in superb condition with just very minimal wear. The 9 375 stamps to each link are nice and clear with only just a few showing signs of wear. This is a great example of a piece of jewellery popular in the late 19th and early 20th century.